Illegal killing of white sharks occurring in Tunisia

How many different types of fishermen exist in the Mediterranean?

In December 2012 a large great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias, got caught in a tuna net in Tunisia, near Sousse, and was killed by the fishermen involved.  A video of the brutal episode is available on the internet.

The Mediterranean population of great white . . . → Read More: Illegal killing of white sharks occurring in Tunisia

Sign the Petition and Help Protect Mantas

 

 

If YOU would like to help The Manta Trust to conserve both species of mantas please sign and share its online petition here.  You might have seen online petitions for these types of conservation initiatives before, but to find out what The Manta Trust’s petition is all about and WHY YOUR SIGNATURE WILL REALLY HELP read on… If English . . . → Read More: Sign the Petition and Help Protect Mantas

Pushing forward the Pelagos Sanctuary and the conservation of marine mammals in the Mediterranean Sea

I posted this article on the Open Channels Forum for Ocean Planning and Management on 11 November 2012

More than 20 years ago (1991), under the impetus of the highest concern for the survival of cetacean populations in the Mediterranean, strongly impacted by human activities (most notably bycatch in pelagic driftnets), with colleagues I . . . → Read More: Pushing forward the Pelagos Sanctuary and the conservation of marine mammals in the Mediterranean Sea

Debunking myths on Mediterranean great white sharks

(first posted on 1 Nov. 2010; adapted from an article appeared in Italian on La Rivista della Natura) Towards the end of summer 2009 the welcome news arrived that great white sharks still exist in the Mediterranean. A newborn female, slightly longer than 1.5 m, sadly met her fate in the bottom of a . . . → Read More: Debunking myths on Mediterranean great white sharks

The oceans are dying, long live the oceans!

Image via Wikipedia

This article was published in Italian on 23 June 2011 on the website of “Il Fatto Quotidiano”

A group of leading experts in marine conservation met in London last April to take stock of the condition of the oceans, and days ago a report with their conclusions hit the world’s . . . → Read More: The oceans are dying, long live the oceans!

Pelagic driftnets: a Mediterranean metastasis

This article was published in Italian on 16 June 2011 on the website of “Il Fatto Quotidiano”

It would be difficult to find a better example than the swordfish fishery in Italy for exemplifying what NOT to do as far as management of the marine environment and its resources are concerned.  In the old . . . → Read More: Pelagic driftnets: a Mediterranean metastasis

Monk seal sightings in Egypt

Photo: A.M. Abd El Malek

 

This article first appeared on the “Monk Seal Latest News”. I thank William Johnson, Editor of The Monachus Guardian, for significantly improving our manuscript.  The article is co-authored by Mahmoud Fouad, from the Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency of . . . → Read More: Monk seal sightings in Egypt

Tethys’ 25th birthday

So, the Tethys Research Institute is now a quarter of century old.  That distant 31 January 1986 seems like yesterday though, when I walked into the notary’s office to create Tethys with friend Egidio Gavazzi, then the publisher of Aqua, a magazine I was science editor of.  At the time we were animated by . . . → Read More: Tethys’ 25th birthday

The unlikely tourist whale

(adapted from an article appeared in Italian on La Rivista della Natura)

A huge back breaks the calm surface of the Mediterranean in front of Jaffa, attracting the attention of Aviad Scheinin, of the Israel Marine Mammal Research & Assistance Centre.  It is the morning of 8 May 2010, and Aviad is surveying the . . . → Read More: The unlikely tourist whale

Aphrodite was born in an oilfield

Days ago we learned from the news that a team of marine biologists from the University of Haifa discovered a reef of deep-sea coral at a depth of 700 m, about 20 nautical miles west of Tel Aviv.  This is not the first time that deep-sea coral, also known as “white coral” because . . . → Read More: Aphrodite was born in an oilfield